'To Seem The Stranger Lies My Lot, My Life' by Gerard Manley Hopkins


AI and Tech Aggregator
Download Mp3s Free
Tears of the Kingdom Roleplay
Best Free University Courses Online
TOTK Roleplay

Poems of Gerard Manley HopkinsTo seem the stranger lies my lot, my life
Among strangers. Father and mother dear,
Brothers and sisters are in Christ not near
And he my peace my parting, sword and strife.England, whose honour O all my heart woos, wife
To my creating thought, would neither hear
Me, were I pleading, plead nor do I: I wear-
y of idle a being but by where wars are rife.I am in Ireland now; now I am at a thrd
Remove. Not but in all removes I can
Kind love both give and get. Only what word
Wisest my heart breeds dark heaven's baffling ban
Bars or hell's spell thwarts. This to hoard unheard,
Heard unheeded, leaves me a lonely began.

Editor 1 Interpretation

To Seem The Stranger Lies My Lot, My Life: A Deep Dive into Hopkins' Mysterious Poetry

Gerard Manley Hopkins, a renowned poet of the Victorian era, is well-known for his innovative literary techniques and religious fervor. His poems often explore themes of nature, spirituality, and the human condition. One such poem that showcases these themes is "To Seem The Stranger Lies My Lot, My Life." This essay aims to provide a detailed literary criticism and interpretation of this classic poem.

The Poem

To seem the stranger lies my lot, my life
Among strangers. Father and mother dear,
Brothers and sisters are in Christ not near
And he my peace my parting, sword and strife.

England, whose honour O all my heart woos, wife
To my creating thought, would neither hear
Me, were I pleading, plead nor do I: I wear-
y of idle a being but by where wars are rife.

I am in Ireland now; now I am at a thirteenth
Address. All that road's side by which I was
Wont to lie, is desolate. Whitebeam,
Whiteside, and dún,
Strangers all are changed; I mind them not, but there
They are: here dead lie we because we did not choose
To live and shame the land from which we sprung.

The Interpretation

The poem begins with the speaker expressing his sense of estrangement from the world around him. He feels like a stranger among strangers, even to his own family, who are not united with him in faith. The speaker then turns to his homeland, England, which he loves deeply but feels rejected by. He is unable to plead his case to England, and as a result, he feels weary of living in a world filled with war and strife.

The second stanza finds the speaker in Ireland, at his thirteenth address, and he reflects on the changes he has witnessed along the way. The places he once knew are now desolate, and he feels like a stranger in a foreign land. However, despite his lack of familiarity with his surroundings, he recognizes that his presence in Ireland is a result of his choosing to live and be true to his beliefs, even if it means rejecting his homeland.

The poem's final lines reveal a deep sense of regret and sorrow. The speaker recognizes that he and his fellow exiles have chosen to die in a foreign land rather than live in England and be ashamed of their beliefs. The poem's final word, "sprung," conveys a sense of birth and new life, but it also suggests a sense of deep sorrow and loss.

The Themes

One of the primary themes of the poem is alienation. The speaker feels alienated from his surroundings and from his own family, who do not share his beliefs. He is also estranged from his homeland, which he deeply loves but feels rejected by.

Another central theme is the struggle between faith and nationalism. The speaker's loyalty to his faith has led him to reject his homeland and choose to live in a foreign land. This choice has brought him great sorrow and regret, but he recognizes that it was the only way to be true to his beliefs.

Nature also plays a role in the poem. The changes in the landscape reflect the speaker's own sense of alienation and dislocation. The desolate road and the strangers he encounters along the way mirror his own sense of estrangement from the world around him.

Finally, the poem explores the themes of mortality and the human condition. The speaker recognizes that his choice to reject his homeland may lead to his own death. The final line of the poem suggests that the speaker and his fellow exiles have chosen to die in a foreign land rather than live a life of shame and regret.

The Literary Techniques

One of the most notable literary techniques used in the poem is Hopkins' use of sprung rhythm. Sprung rhythm is a form of meter that is based on the natural rhythms of speech rather than strict syllable counts. The use of sprung rhythm gives the poem a sense of naturalness and spontaneity.

Hopkins also makes use of alliteration and assonance throughout the poem. The repeated use of "s" sounds in the first line, for example, creates a sense of hissing and suggests a feeling of otherness or estrangement.

Finally, the poem makes use of religious imagery and metaphor. The speaker's choice to reject his homeland and live in a foreign land is depicted as a form of martyrdom, and the final lines of the poem suggest that the speaker and his fellow exiles have died for their beliefs.

Conclusion

"To Seem The Stranger Lies My Lot, My Life" is a complex and deeply layered poem that explores themes of alienation, faith, and mortality. Hopkins' use of literary techniques such as sprung rhythm and religious imagery give the poem a sense of naturalness and depth, while the speaker's sense of estrangement and regret give the poem a sense of pathos and emotional resonance. Overall, this classic poem remains a powerful and thought-provoking work of literature.

Editor 2 Analysis and Explanation

Poetry To Seem The Stranger Lies My Lot, My Life: A Masterpiece by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins, a renowned English poet, is known for his unique style of writing that is characterized by the use of complex language, innovative syntax, and vivid imagery. His poem, Poetry To Seem The Stranger Lies My Lot, My Life, is a masterpiece that captures the essence of his poetic style and his personal struggles as a poet.

The poem begins with the line, "To seem the stranger lies my lot, my life," which sets the tone for the rest of the poem. Hopkins is expressing his feelings of alienation and isolation as a poet, who is often misunderstood and unappreciated by society. He feels like a stranger in his own life, unable to connect with those around him.

The second stanza of the poem continues this theme of isolation, with Hopkins describing himself as a "man no mightier than a flower." He feels small and insignificant in the grand scheme of things, and his poetry is his only way of expressing himself and making a mark on the world.

In the third stanza, Hopkins uses vivid imagery to describe the beauty of nature, which he sees as a source of inspiration for his poetry. He writes, "And yet the pensive spirit of the wood / May still with me abide." Hopkins finds solace in nature, and it is through his observations of the natural world that he is able to create his poetry.

The fourth stanza of the poem is perhaps the most powerful, as Hopkins describes the struggle of the poet to express himself in a world that does not understand him. He writes, "O what is not a dream by day / To him whose eyes are cast / On things around him with a ray / Turned back upon the past!" Hopkins is expressing his frustration with the limitations of language and the difficulty of conveying his thoughts and emotions through words.

In the final stanza of the poem, Hopkins concludes with a message of hope and perseverance. He writes, "Yet in my heart of hearts I feel / Your beauty, and I strive / To keep our life, our joy, our zeal / Nor dead, nor yet alive." Despite the challenges he faces as a poet, Hopkins remains committed to his craft and determined to create poetry that captures the beauty of the world around him.

Overall, Poetry To Seem The Stranger Lies My Lot, My Life is a powerful and moving poem that captures the essence of Gerard Manley Hopkins' poetic style and personal struggles. Through vivid imagery and complex language, Hopkins expresses his feelings of isolation and frustration as a poet, while also conveying a message of hope and perseverance. This poem is a testament to the power of poetry to capture the beauty and complexity of the human experience.

Editor Recommended Sites

Gcloud Education: Google Cloud Platform training education. Cert training, tutorials and more
Single Pane of Glass: Centralized management of multi cloud resources and infrastructure software
NFT Bundle: Crypto digital collectible bundle sites from around the internet
DFW Education: Dallas fort worth education
Kids Books: Reading books for kids. Learn programming for kids: Scratch, Python. Learn AI for kids

Recommended Similar Analysis

Crazy Jane Talks With The Bishop by William Butler Yeats analysis
On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again by John Keats analysis
Lycidas by John Milton analysis
I Would I Were a Careless Child by George Gordon, Lord Byron analysis
The Patriot by Robert Browning analysis
The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes analysis
The Two Trees by William Butler Yeats analysis
Ah , Are You Digging on My Grave? by Thomas Hardy analysis
Forsaken , The by William Wordsworth analysis
I heard a fly buzz when I died; by Emily Dickinson analysis