'Her-"last Poems"' by Emily Dickinson


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Her-"last Poems"-
Poets-ended-
Silver-perished-with her Tongue-
Not on Record-bubbled other,
Flute-or Woman-
So divine-
Not unto its Summer-Morning
Robin-uttered Half the Tune-
Gushed too free for the Adoring-
From the Anglo-Florentine-
Late-the Praise-
'Tis dull-conferring
On the Head too High to Crown-
Diadem-or Ducal Showing-
Be its Grave-sufficient sign-
Nought-that We-No Poet's Kinsman-
Suffocate-with easy woe-
What, and if, Ourself a Bridegroom-
Put Her down-in Italy?

Editor 1 Interpretation

A Profound Interpretation of Emily Dickinson's "Her-Last Poems"

Emily Dickinson, an American poet of the 19th century, is known for her unconventional and enigmatic poetry. Her-Last Poems, a collection of poems published posthumously, is a remarkable representation of her poetic genius. Dickinson's literary style is characterized by the use of dashes, slant rhymes, and unconventional punctuation, which makes her poetry a complex yet profound piece of art. In this literary criticism and interpretation, we will explore the themes, motifs, and symbols of Her-Last Poems and delve deeper into the meanings behind Dickinson's words.

The Theme of Death

Death is a recurring theme throughout Her-Last Poems, which is not surprising considering Dickinson's preoccupation with mortality. In her poetry, she explores death from various angles, including the fear of death, the acceptance of death, and the mystery surrounding death. One of the most powerful poems in this collection is "I heard a Fly buzz – when I died." In this poem, Dickinson describes the final moments of a dying person and the "stillness in the Room" before the person takes their last breath. The fly buzzing in the background signifies the inevitability of death, and the uncertainty of what lies beyond death.

Another poem that explores the theme of death is "Because I could not stop for Death." In this poem, Dickinson personifies death as a kind and patient gentleman who takes the speaker on a slow carriage ride towards eternity. The imagery in this poem is vivid and symbolic, with the "Dews drew quivering and chill," representing the speaker's growing awareness of their mortality. The theme of death in Her-Last Poems is not a morbid obsession but a reflection on the human condition and the fragility of life.

Nature and Transcendence

Nature is another prominent theme in Dickinson's poetry. In Her-Last Poems, nature is used as a metaphor for transcendence, the idea of rising above the material world and connecting with the divine. In "Nature rarer uses Yellow," Dickinson personifies nature and describes how it uses the color yellow sparingly, making it all the more precious. This poem can be interpreted as a metaphor for the divine, which is also rare and precious.

Another poem that uses nature as a metaphor for transcendence is "Further in Summer than the Birds." In this poem, Dickinson describes how the speaker's soul is soaring higher than the birds and experiencing a state of ecstasy. The imagery in this poem is breathtaking, with the speaker's soul flying "higher than the crickets leap" and the speaker's heart beating like a "drum kept beating – beating – till I thought my mind was going numb." The theme of transcendence in Her-Last Poems is a testament to Dickinson's belief in the spiritual and the divine.

Love and Loss

Love and loss are recurring themes in Emily Dickinson's poetry, and Her-Last Poems is no exception. In "That after Horror – that 'twas us," Dickinson explores the theme of lost love and the pain that comes with it. The speaker in the poem is reminiscing about a past love and the memories they shared. The poem's use of repetition, with the phrase "That after Horror – that 'twas us," emphasizes the speaker's sense of loss and longing.

Another poem that explores the theme of love and loss is "My life had stood – a Loaded Gun." In this poem, the speaker compares themselves to a loaded gun that is waiting to be fired. The poem's complex imagery can be interpreted as a metaphor for the speaker's unrequited love and the pain that comes with it. The theme of love and loss in Her-Last Poems is a reflection on the human condition and the inevitability of heartbreak.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Emily Dickinson's Her-Last Poems is a profound representation of her poetic genius. The themes of death, nature, transcendence, love, and loss are explored in a complex yet beautiful way. Dickinson's unconventional use of punctuation and imagery makes her poetry a challenging yet rewarding read. Her-Last Poems is a testament to Dickinson's belief in the spiritual and the divine, and her preoccupation with mortality. Through her poetry, Dickinson invites us to reflect on the human condition and the timeless themes that unite us all.

Editor 2 Analysis and Explanation

Emily Dickinson is one of the most celebrated poets of all time, and her work continues to inspire and captivate readers to this day. Her "Last Poems" are a particularly poignant and powerful collection, showcasing Dickinson's unique voice and her ability to capture the complexities of human emotion in just a few lines of verse.

In this analysis, we will delve into the themes and motifs present in Dickinson's "Last Poems," exploring the ways in which she grapples with mortality, love, and the nature of existence itself.

One of the most striking aspects of Dickinson's "Last Poems" is the way in which she confronts the inevitability of death. Throughout the collection, she grapples with the idea of mortality, exploring the ways in which it shapes our lives and our relationships with others.

In "I Died for Beauty," for example, Dickinson imagines a conversation between two deceased individuals who have been buried side by side. The poem explores the idea that even in death, we are still connected to one another, and that our shared experiences and struggles continue to bind us together.

Similarly, in "Because I could not stop for Death," Dickinson personifies death as a gentleman caller who takes her on a carriage ride through the countryside. The poem is a meditation on the inevitability of death, and the way in which it shapes our lives and our perceptions of the world around us.

Another recurring theme in Dickinson's "Last Poems" is the nature of love and human connection. In many of her poems, she explores the ways in which love can be both a source of joy and a source of pain, and the ways in which it can shape our lives and our sense of self.

In "Wild Nights - Wild Nights!" for example, Dickinson imagines a passionate and intense love affair, one that is both exhilarating and overwhelming. The poem captures the intensity of romantic love, and the way in which it can consume us completely.

Similarly, in "I cannot live with You," Dickinson explores the complexities of love and relationships, and the ways in which they can be both fulfilling and frustrating. The poem is a meditation on the challenges of intimacy, and the way in which our desire for connection can sometimes lead to our own undoing.

Finally, Dickinson's "Last Poems" are also notable for their exploration of the nature of existence itself. In many of her poems, she grapples with the big questions of life, exploring the mysteries of the universe and our place within it.

In "The Brain - is wider than the Sky," for example, Dickinson muses on the vastness of the human mind, and the way in which it can contain multitudes. The poem is a celebration of the human intellect, and a meditation on the power of the human imagination.

Similarly, in "I felt a Funeral, in my Brain," Dickinson explores the idea of consciousness and the nature of the self. The poem is a haunting meditation on the experience of being alive, and the way in which our own thoughts and perceptions can sometimes feel like a kind of prison.

In conclusion, Emily Dickinson's "Last Poems" are a powerful and moving collection, one that showcases her unique voice and her ability to capture the complexities of human emotion in just a few lines of verse. Through her exploration of mortality, love, and the nature of existence itself, Dickinson offers us a glimpse into the mysteries of the human experience, and reminds us of the power of poetry to capture the essence of what it means to be alive.

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